Showing posts tagged art.
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Blue Rider Press

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Publisher and laboratory for the written word. Where readers and authors meet. A division of Penguin Random House.

Book paintings by Ekaterina Panikanova.

— 1 year ago with 1 note
Original 1937 jacket design for Tolkein’s The Hobbit, via Buzzfeed’s 22 Most Iconic Book Covers. We also love Catcher in the Rye.

Original 1937 jacket design for Tolkein’s The Hobbit, via Buzzfeed’s 22 Most Iconic Book Covers. We also love Catcher in the Rye.

— 1 year ago with 38 notes
theartofgooglebooks:

Reader comments on image—“Modesty!!”—and another reader questions the comment—”?”
From p. 26 of Poems by Samuel Rogers by Samuel Rogers (1816). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized March 12, 2008.


Tumblr crush of the week: The Art of Google Books

theartofgooglebooks:

Reader comments on image—“Modesty!!”—and another reader questions the comment—”?”

From p. 26 of Poems by Samuel Rogers by Samuel Rogers (1816). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized March 12, 2008.

Tumblr crush of the week: The Art of Google Books

— 1 year ago with 27 notes
Self portrait of Charles Bukowski via The Atlantic

Self portrait of Charles Bukowski via The Atlantic

— 1 year ago with 323 notes

"Riding on my lost horse looking for it."


The Dude and the Zen Master features a lovely drawing by author Jeff Bridges on the cover.

— 1 year ago with 8 notes
#slinkachusday
The artist Slinkachu via lomography.com
— 1 year ago with 1 note
Happy Slinkachu-sday!
Note: Slinkachu’s NYC show has been extended for another week!

Happy Slinkachu-sday!

Note: Slinkachu’s NYC show has been extended for another week!

— 1 year ago with 2 notes

Slinkachu’s incredible photography on display at the Broome Street Gallery in New York through October 7th. He also created an amazing installation of hot air balloons.

His book of photography, Global Model Village, is on sale now!

— 1 year ago with 6 notes
"The coral blue cover stamped with a dark blue swimming cap makes clear that Swimming Studies is indeed meant to be a physical object, a piece of art. The book features some of Shapton’s watercolors. Their subtleness is strikingly appropriate. The same as a flailing splashing crawl stroke does not result in swimming fast, no matter how quickly you move your arms, Shapton knows how to make both her written and visual ideas glide, concealing the hard work necessary to create the perception of effortlessness. All that matters is the end result. Though in this case, the artwork is secondary because Swimming Studies is not about Leanne Shapton the artist, it is about Leanne Shapton the person, and while swimming, visual arts, and other people are all vital components in her existence, she has learned how to define them, rather than let them define her: swimming not as a way of life but life as a way of swimming."
The Millions reviews Leanne Shapton’s Swimming Studies
— 2 years ago